Sour Mash: getting your Clojure into a JAR

Clojure jarring experts at work

This weekend I decided to finally bite the bullet and deploy one of my Clojure apps as a JAR. “Certainly” I thought to myself, “there are great tutorials for this online”. Yes, yes there are, except none of them worked for me and in fact did lead to the consumption of some rye whiskey.

Caveats: Every Clojure app is different, and the details of your app will determine the steps necessary to build a JAR. None of the information I found online specifically addressed the problems I had, so I made this post for those who have a similar application with similar needs. YMMV. Read more about Sour Mash: getting your Clojure into a JAR…

Deterministic Pixels

Identikon Q*berts

I’ve always liked identicons, which WordPress and GitHub have used to great effect. The premise is simple: take a user identifier such as an IP or email address and deterministically convert it into an image based on a simple algorithm. To that I end I started hacking on Identikon - a little Racket program that generates different types of identicons based on rules modules. Read more about Deterministic Pixels…

EventedArray: a JavaScript conveyor belt

Sushi by
Steve Petrucelli

This post takes a quick look at EventedArray, a small Array-like JavaScript data structure (written in CoffeeScript) that allows you to register callbacks on accessor/mutator operations and also create fixed size buffers. All examples are in JavaScript. Read more about EventedArray: a JavaScript conveyor belt…

Get Functional with Underscore-Contrib

UnderscoreJS

TL;DR - Fogus and Jeremy Ashkenas published the underscore-contrib repo recently which is loaded with functional JavaScript goodness based on the popular underscore library. I walk through a few examples of how I use it in the hopes you’ll get interested in working out new ways to solve your own day-to-day issues. Read more about Get Functional with Underscore-Contrib…

Hacking up sites with Middleman

Middleman

TL;DR - I’m going to walk through how I rebuilt this blog using a static site generator. In the first half I walk through my decision for moving to a static site. You can skip down to the tech talk if you want. Read more about Hacking up sites with Middleman…

Heroku and your demo: It's great till it isn't

Heroku

In my previous blog post I linked to a demo application hosted on Heroku. Heroku is great, as you can use their free hosting to quickly get your demo up online using a variety of technologies. Unfortunately I ran into a few issues related to traffic spikes and bad weather. The cloud is great, until it’s not. Read more about Heroku and your demo: It's great till it isn't…

Backbone.js and You

Spine

I’m currently working with the amazing folks at Arc90 on a pretty hefty project. It’s a great working environment that really stresses collaboration and learning, with weekly code and design reviews. We’re starting to use Backbone.js on a number of projects, so a quick talk was organized to explain the ins and outs to everyone. Since I had worked on some previous projects using Backbone, they asked me to do an intro. Read more about Backbone.js and You…

Protip: URL Parameters with Nginx & PHP

Firefox

If you’re using nginx as your webserver and need to pass URL parameters to your PHP front controller then some adjustments to your configuration file are necessary: Read more about Protip: URL Parameters with Nginx & PHP…

For Programmers: The Best of edw519

Programming

A while back on Hacker News, a.k.a Ed Weissman posted his collection of tips and advice for programmers. It was amazing stuff. Read more about For Programmers: The Best of edw519…

My little friend z

WOPR

I’m a command line interface kind of guy, which is funny since I do everything on Macs. Then again, I first embraced PCs with an Apple IIe, which was a CLI only experience.

One little tool I’ve had installed for a while is z by Rupa. It’s a nice little shell script that keeps tabs on the directories you’ve been cding in and out of and then lets you quickjump to them using a simple regex. So instead of remembering a long path like: Read more about My little friend z…